Create a wild hedge for the sake of nature - Create a wild hedge for the sake of nature!

Create a wild hedge for the sake of nature!

Transform your garden into a friendly place for birds, small animals and insects by creating an eco-friendly wild hedge. By doing this, you not only support wildlife through shelter and food, but also reduce pollution. Because hedges absorb the exhaust fumes from cars. A lively hedge also offers you a discreet view and wind protection, which at the same time suppresses noise. With such a decision, you are always on the winning side and look forward to a cozy garden oasis that offers people and animals relaxation and security.

Birds especially love hedges with berries

Create a wild hedge for the sake of nature - Create a wild hedge for the sake of nature!

What is the best time of year to plant a wild hedge?

That depends on whether you’re planting hedges that are already in pots or bare-rooted. If you are planting bare root hedges then the season to do so is October/November as the soil is still warm and the roots start growing immediately. And when they sprout in April, they are already established. Just think carefully about the type of deer hedge you want and the space you have.

A sustainable hedge always looks good, even if it is not trimmed regularly

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Important tips for planning your wild hedge

To prepare for the fall planting season, summer is a good time to plan your live fence. Here are a few important tips:

  • Plant flowering trees first. Good choices are shorter, undergrown species like native dogwood and serviceberry. To form an interwoven green wall, choose natural clump shapes instead of standard trees. If space is tight, ditch the trees and plant more shrubs instead.
  • Select a variety of native shrubs. Snowballs, blueberries, raspberries, elderberries and willows provide food for wildlife all season long, from spring bees to summer songbirds to autumn migrating monarch butterflies. Wax myrtle, laurel and holly also provide fruits that persist through the winter.
  • Include native evergreens and shrubs such as brambles. Trees such as juniper and cedar provide safe shelter for wild animals. Additionally, native roses, raspberries, blackberries, salmonberries, and foxgloves not only provide fruit, but also form thorn bushes to deter cats and other predators.

A great example of this is rose hips

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  • Add more vines. Let the vines climb up the bushes into the trees. A native grapevine provides fruit for feathered friends, while a native honeysuckle offers insects plenty of nectar.
  • More nectar plants won’t hurt. From savory in spring to milkweed in summer to goldenrod in fall, flowering native perennials provide pollen and nectar for bees and butterflies, and leaves for caterpillars to munch on.

The Lesser Tortoiseshell (Aglais urticae) will also thank you with its colorful nuances

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Which plants for which wild hedge?

Best hedges for small gardens

Caucasian laurel (Prunus laurocerasus ‘Caucasica’) has longer and narrower leaves and a more upright habit, making it easier to keep narrow than the usual species when space is limited. If you let the plants flower they will be very attractive to bees while the fruit will be a welcome meal for hungry birds later in the year.

Mug Yew (Taxus media ‘Hicksii’) is a more upright version of the popular hedge species. She grows pretty fast when she’s young. The upright habit makes them easier to keep narrow.

Emerald Thuja (Thuja occidentalis ‘Smaragd’) are easy-care conifers that deserve to be extremely popular for wild hedges. They make a great alternative coniferous hedge with an upright habit and are ideal for an urban garden.

Small birds like to find their nesting sites here

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Hedge cotoneaster (Cotoneaster dammeri) are reliable and evergreen. They also thrive in cold weather and have a moderate growth rate and lots of beautiful flowers and red berries.

green and purple beech (Fagus sylvatica/atropunicea) look good all year round thanks to their foliage. It is best to keep them as small as 60 cm high and 30 cm wide.

Feel free to combine with lavender

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Best hedges for more biodiversity

rose family such as (R. rugosa , Rosa canina, R. pimpinellifolia and R. rubiginosa) are also excellent at attracting wildlife to your property. Its nectar- and pollen-rich flowers are far better for insect pollination than more modern double-flowered varieties.

With its delicate, white flowers, R. pimpinellifolia blends perfectly into your natural hedge

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lavender (Lavandula angustifolia, L. intermedia, L. stoechas) is one of the very best plants if you want to attract bees and butterflies. Plant a variety of long-flowering species to keep them coming.

liguster (Ligustrum) has many nectar-rich flowers that can attract more than a dozen butterfly species. Later in the season, the fruits are also popular with a variety of birds.

Firethorn (Pyracantha) will also make your garden very popular with birds when the berries become colorful later in the season, especially the red ones.

Birds find the small red berries simply irresistible

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snowberry (Symphoricarpos) has insignificant flowers but are a good food source, especially for the Holly Blue butterfly.

Blooming currant (Ribes Sanguineum) is considered an excellent early season nectar source for solitary bees, bumblebees and also butterflies.

Barberry Varieties such as (Berberis darwinii and B.thunbergii) are prime bee plants and a food source for moths and butterflies while providing shelter for many caterpillars. The barberry is popular with thrushes, waxwings and blackbirds.

The little, feathered friends will definitely spend more time in your garden

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In principle, a wild hedge requires little work once it has grown out. And as you enjoy the beautiful flowers and fruits in the garden, you will also feel a deep sense of satisfaction. Because you know you’ve made the lives of many small creatures that little bit easier – from year-round residents to ravenous songbirds and butterflies that roam about during migration.

Enjoy a fun, chirping company all year round!

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And in spring and summer admire the beautiful butterflies

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Rely on native hedge plants

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