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Seasonal Calendar January – Bloomy Blog

Seasonal Calendar January - Bloomy Blog
Seasonal Calendar January Bloomy Blog - Seasonal Calendar January - Bloomy Blog
Floral seasonal calendar January

Sometimes you walk past a flower shop or discover a certain flower in one of our postings and think to yourself: “Oh, it’s back now!” – You are not alone. Similar to fruits and vegetables, many flowers are in season. Depending on the flowering time and growing area, they are only available for a short time.

In order to bring the flower year closer to you in the future, we have developed a flower season calendar. In it we want to introduce you to the seasonal flowers every month.

Flowers in January

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Seasonal calendar January – daffodil

daffodil

One of the heralds of spring par excellence: the daffodil. It is popularly known as the daffodil, although the daffodil is actually just a special type of the daffodil genus. Thanks to greenhouse breeding, we can already enjoy the first daffodils from January. In addition to their bright yellow color, daffodils are particularly popular because of their uncomplicated care. But be careful: daffodils are highly toxic and therefore dangerous for children and animals. By the way, the daffodil stands for rebirth in the language of flowers. Daffodils used to be found in southern Europe, but then spread quite quickly and can now even be found on the coast of Morocco.

camellia

Another representative of the January flowers is the camellia. This was originally a Chinese tea leaf plant and was used for green and black tea 4,000 years ago. It was also very popular as an ornamental shrub because of its beautiful, large flowers. The flowers are somewhat reminiscent of peonies and can grow up to 15 cm. So it is no surprise that the camellia was exported to Europe in the 16th century and has been cultivated here as a garden plant ever since.

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Seasonal calendar January – camellia
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Seasonal calendar January – tulip

tulip

As soon as we throw the Christmas tree out of the window, or at least out of the living room, we have space for the number 1 among the heralds of spring: the tulips. After you have probably been surrounded by fir green and Christmas red and gold for the past few weeks, you are certainly looking forward to flowers that scream for spring as much as we do. And we will certainly agree that no flower puts us in a spring mood more easily than the tulip. Thanks to the incredible variety of colors, tulips ensure a good mood, even if it’s still gray and dreary outside. Incidentally, the tulips that appear in the first few months of the year are mostly greenhouse tulips. Outdoor tulips are available from March or April.

hyacinth

The hyacinth can also be found in the ranks of the heralds of spring, which we pounce on in the first weeks of January. Is it because of the wide range of colors or the small, cute calyxes? We literally melt away at the sight of hyacinths. By the way, after cutting the hyacinths, you should first put them in a separate vase for half an hour, because they give off – just like daffodils – a slime that can prevent other flowers from absorbing water. Oh, and one more interesting fact: Hyacinths are perennial flowers and can even live up to 15 years in the garden or in a flower pot – they are more or less “teenage” hyacinths.

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Seasonal calendar January – hyacinth
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Seasonal calendar January – Amaryllis

amaryllis

Even if it is our star of the Christmas season, the amaryllis is also one of the January flowers. Because with its long shelf life of up to three weeks in the vase and even several weeks in the pot or in wax, it not only celebrates New Year’s Eve with you, but also makes the first weeks of January a little more colorful. In order for this to work, you should change the vase water of the amaryllis regularly and cut them again with a sharp knife. Don’t forget to wear gloves! Amaryllis are poisonous – especially for animals!

Ranunculus

You won’t get past them in January either: Ranunculus. There are no limits to these pretty daisy family – neither in the color palette nor in the flower size or the abundance of the flower petals. With ranunculus, you can pretty well watch how they bloom a little more day by day. Ranunculus are particularly beautiful when mixed with other flowers, such as B. tulips, daffodils or anemones can be combined. Before you put the buttercups in the vase, you should remove everything green that protrudes into the water, otherwise the water will quickly get rotten.

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Seasonal calendar January – ranunculus
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Seasonal Calendar January – Rose Rose Hip

rose

The rose – an everbloom. In Europe, of course, roses don’t bloom all year round, but thanks to greenhouses and fast transport by plane, the rose is now available as a year-round cut flower. Most of the roses come from Africa in winter, where the sun shines almost all year round and therefore creates ideal conditions for growing roses. In summer they come mainly from local nurseries.

rose hip

You probably know the rose hip as a vitamin bomb or as itching powder. And actually, rose hips aren’t flowers at all. Strictly speaking, they are the nut fruits of various types of roses. But we think that they still belong to the January “flowers” or to the January accessories, because they are simply an eye-catcher with their great red color. In theory, you could nibble rose hips straight from the bush if you removed the nuts beforehand. Most of them are used to make jam or liqueur.

Winter jasmine

Again an export from Asia, more precisely from East Asia and China. Winter jasmine was only brought to Europe in the 19th century and is particularly popular here because of its early flowering period. In mild winters, the winter jasmine may even start to bud in December. Then individual branches can simply be cut off and placed in a vase inside. After a few days the buds open and the bright yellow flowers appear.

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Seasonal calendar January – winter jasmine

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